Kabetogama Resorts For Sale

A couple of big resorts are for sale on Kabetogama.

Sandy Point Resort-CLICK HERE!

 

sandpt

 

Arrowhead Resort for sale link-CLICK HERE!

Eagle Wing Resort is for sale- http://www.northmnlakeshorerealty.com/homes-for-sale-details/10042-GAPPA-ROAD-KABETOGAMA-MN-56669/130206/238/

Pine Aire for sale=http://www.northmnlakeshorerealty.com/homes-for-sale-details/9978-GAPPA-ROAD-KABETOGAMA-MN-56669/131940/238/

Welcome To LakeKabetogama.Org




News from Lake Kabetogama, Minnesota

Welcome to Lake Kabetogama.org, a place to share information on the Lake Kabetogama area.
Lake Kabetogama is one of four vast, interconnected lakes in Voyageurs National Park. Lake Kabetogama, Rainy Lake, Namakan Lake, and Sand Point Lake are part of the 14,900-square-mile Rainy Lake basin. Lake Kabetogama is about 25000 acres in size with about 200 islands and has a maximum depth of about 90 feet.


Lake Kabetogama has hundreds of island campsites

maintained by the Park with docks, tent pads, campfire rings and primitive toilets. Most also have lockable bear boxes for your food. Some of my favorites are Windigo Bay, great views, Cutover Island on the south side, Grassy Island site, another one with great views, but it does have bears at times,  and my favorite, Blue Fin Bay, which has great crappie fishing, views and lots of wildlife.

The following is from the Voyageurs National Park web site-
Sleep under the stars in one of over 200 designated campsites in Voyageurs National Park. Be serenaded by loons, and listen for the chance to hear the howl of a wolf. (more…)

2017 GMU 2 Wolf Harvest Quota Announced

CRAIG, Alaska — Biologists with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G), in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, announce that the GMU 2 wolf harvest quota for regulatory year (RY) 2017 will be set at 46 wolves. ADF&G and the U.S. Forest Service currently manage wolves on Prince of Wales and associated islands, […]
Source: New feed

Drowning On Lake Kabetogama

An Illinois man drowned and his fishing buddy was arrested Wednesday following a boating accident on Lake Kabetogama .

Stanislaw Kozaczka, 55, Harwood Heights, Ill., was arrested for criminal vehicular operation — alcohol (0.09, barely 3 beers)— resulting in death after Wlodzimierz Dziechciowski, 66, Chicago, fell out of the boat Kozaczka was driving.

Kozaczka was lodged at the St. Louis County Jail in Hibbing pending formal charges by the St. Louis County Attorney’s Office.

Kozaczka told the St. Louis County Sheriff’s Office that at nearly 5 p.m. the boat struck the wake of another boat (did they check blood alcohol of the driver of the big boat that nearly swamped them?) and Dziechciowski fell overboard. He said with the help of a passerby, he was able to pull the unconscious Dziechciowski from the water and back into the boat, and they traveled to Park Point Resort where they made a 911 call for help.

Medical staff responded to the scene where they provided life-saving efforts, but Dziechciowski was pronounced dead at the scene.

The cause of death is pending autopsy results by the Midwest Medical Examiner’s Office in Anoka.

The incident remains under investigation by the St. Louis County Sheriff’s Office, which was was assisted by the Kabetogama Fire & First Responders, International Falls Ambulance Service, Life Link air medical, St. Louis County Rescue Squad, Kabetogama Commercial Club, Rocky Ledge Bar and Grill, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Bill Roden, my dog and assorted others.

Zebra mussel larvae confirmed in Garfield Lake in Hubbard County

An independent laboratory has confirmed zebra mussel larvae in Garfield Lake in Hubbard County.

The lab provided photos of two zebra mussel larvae, called veligers, found in a water sample taken from the lake. Property owners on Garfield Lake hired the lab as part of their own monitoring. Invasive species specialists from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources found no zebra mussels in the lake during a six-hour dive survey.

Garfield Lake will be added to the Infested Waters List for zebra mussels, with the provision that it may be removed from the list if future surveys continue to show no zebra mussels in the lake.

Whether or not a lake is listed as infested, Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:

  • Clean watercraft of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species,
  • Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and
  • Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash.

Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters:

  • Spray with high-pressure water.
  • Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 10 seconds).
  • Dry for at least five days.

As boat owners begin taking boats and equipment out of the water for the season, the DNR reminds them to carefully check for aquatic invasive species and contact the DNR with any suspected new infestations. Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.

Minnesota law requires that docks and lifts be allowed to dry for at least 21 days before being placed in another body of water, whether aquatic invasive species are present or not.

People should contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.

More information is available at www.mndnr.gov/AIS.

Source: Mn DNR

Zebra mussels confirmed in Lakeville’s Lake Marion

City may apply for DNR pilot project treatment

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed zebra mussels in Lake Marion, in the city of Lakeville, in Dakota County.

Five adult zebra mussels were found at the public access by a lake consulting business, as part of an early detection monitoring program conducted for the city of Lakeville. The city may apply for a pilot project treatment after a more thorough search of the lake is completed.

As boat owners begin taking boats and equipment out of the water for the season, the DNR reminds them to carefully check for aquatic invasive species and contact the DNR with any suspected new infestations. Look on the posts, wheels and underwater support bars of docks and lifts, as well as any parts of boats, pontoons and rafts that may have been submerged in water for an extended period.

Minnesota law requires that docks and lifts be allowed to dry for at least 21 days before being placed in another body of water, whether aquatic invasive species are present or not.

Minnesota law requires boaters and anglers to:

  • Clean watercraft of aquatic plants and prohibited invasive species.
  • Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keeping them out during transport, and
  • Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash.

Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters:

  • Spray with high-pressure water.
  • Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 10 seconds).
  • Dry for at least five days.

People should contact an area DNR aquatic invasive species specialist if they think they have found zebra mussels or any other invasive species that has not already been confirmed in a lake.

More information is available at www.mndnr.gov/AIS.

Source: Mn DNR

Good waterfowl opener expected this weekend

Duck hunting is expected to be good when Minnesota’s regular waterfowl season opens a half-hour before sunrise on Saturday, Sept. 23.

“The number of breeding ducks in Minnesota and North America has been good in recent years, so we’re optimistic that will result in a good duck season,” said Steve Cordts, waterfowl specialist with the Department of Natural Resources. “Wetland habitat conditions and wild rice lakes are in pretty good shape.  Canada goose populations remain high as well, so there’s lots of opportunity to hunt geese this fall.”

Duck seasons and limits
The duck season structure is similar to recent years. The waterfowl seasons are based on a federal framework that applies to all states in the Mississippi Flyway. Waterfowl hunting regulations are available wherever DNR licenses are sold and online at mndnr.gov/regulations/hunting.

Duck season will be open for 60 days in each of the three waterfowl zones:

  • In the north zone, duck season is Sept. 23 through Tuesday, Nov. 21.
  • In the central zone, duck season is Sept. 23 through Sunday, Oct. 1, closes for five days, then reopens Saturday, Oct. 7, and runs through Sunday, Nov. 26.
  • In the south zone, duck season is Sept. 23 through Oct. 1, closes for 12 days, then reopens Saturday, Oct. 14, and runs through Sunday, Dec. 3.

The daily duck bag limit remains six per day. The mallard bag limit remains four per day, including no more than two hen mallards. The daily bag limits are three for wood duck and scaup; and two for redheads, canvasbacks and black ducks and one for pintails.

The DNR will post a weekly waterfowl migration report each week during the duck season. The reports are typically posted on Thursday afternoon at mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl.

Goose and sandhill crane seasons
Minnesota’s goose season will reopen in conjunction with the duck season statewide on Sept. 23, with a bag limit of three dark geese per day the entire season. “Dark” geese include Canada geese, white-fronted geese and brant. The daily bag limit for light geese is 20. “Light geese” include snow, blue and Ross’s geese.  Goose season will be closed in the central and south duck zones when duck season is closed.

The season for sandhill cranes remains open through Sunday, Oct. 22 in the northwest goose and sandhill crane zone only. The daily bag limit will be one sandhill crane per day. A $3 sandhill crane permit is required in addition to a small game hunting license.

More information on duck, goose, sandhill crane and other migratory bird hunting is available in the 2017 Minnesota Waterfowl Hunting Regulations booklet from license vendors and online at mndnr.gov/hunting/waterfowl.

Source: Mn DNR

Citizens can apply to serve on Lake of the Woods input group

Citizens interested in volunteering to discuss Lake of the Woods fish and habitat can apply to participate in the Lake of the Woods fisheries input group, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Applications must be completed by Monday, Oct. 10, and are available online at mndnr.gov/lakeofthewoods.

“Input provided by this group will be used to update the Lake of the Woods Fisheries Management Plan for 2018 to 2023,” said Phil Talmage, Baudette area fisheries supervisor.

“Volunteers will give valuable stakeholder perspectives regarding important fisheries and habitat protection strategies for Lake of the Woods and the surrounding watershed,” Talmage said.

Group members will meet five or six times between December and May to cover topics including walleye and sauger management, sportfish population objectives, habitat priorities and invasive species.

Talmage said protecting the high quality resources within Lake of the Woods is important.

“While walleye in Lake of the Woods are a big focus of the DNR’s management efforts, the lake also offers a wide range of fishing and other recreational opportunities that are vital to local communities, important to northern Minnesota and of significant value statewide,” Talmage said.

For additional information on the Lake of the Woods fisheries input group and the self-nomination process, contact the DNR Baudette area fisheries office, 218-634-2522.

Source: Mn DNR

DNR opens public comment period on draft PolyMet dam safety and public waters work permits

The Department of Natural Resources is seeking comments, from Sept. 15 through Oct. 16, on two draft dam safety permits and a draft public waters work permit for the Poly Met Mining, Inc. (PolyMet) NorthMet mining project. The permits relate to a proposed copper-nickel mine near Hoyt Lakes in northeastern Minnesota.
This is the public’s opportunity to submit written comments on these draft permits.
One draft dam safety permit covers the proposed flotation tailings basin, which would receive tailings (a mixture of finely ground waste rock and water) after the commercially recoverable copper, nickel and other elements are removed. This proposed tailings basin would be on the site of the existing tailings basin of the historic LTV iron ore mine.

The second draft dam safety permit covers the proposed hydrometallurgical residue facility, which would receive residue (mostly gypsum) generated from a process that would use pressure and temperature reactions to extract additional precious metals beyond what can be achieved by the primary processing facility.

PolyMet initially submitted its dam safety permit applications in July 2016. Since then, the DNR, its external consultant Emmons Olivier Resources, Inc. (EOR), and a team of top geotechnical dam safety experts assessed the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the proposed NorthMet dams. This team included experts in mining geotechnical engineering with both Minnesota and worldwide experience. The group included a member of the review panel that previously investigated the Mount Polley dam failure in British Columbia.

The DNR considered input from state, local, and tribal government technical experts. The applications have been used to create the two draft dam safety permits, which the DNR is now releasing for public comment.

The DNR dam safety permit program regulates the construction, operation, and maintenance of Minnesota dams to protect public health, safety and welfare. Minnesota rules establish standards and criteria for dams, which cover both initial permitting and ongoing regulatory oversight.

PolyMet also submitted an application for a public waters work permit in May 2017. The DNR recently completed its comprehensive review of this application, and considered input from state, local, and tribal government technical experts to create the draft public waters work permit.

The draft public waters work permit is for a culvert extension to widen Dunka Road, the connecting road between the proposed NorthMet plant site and mine site. It would extend the culvert on Unnamed Creek, which is a tributary to Wyman Creek, a public water.
The DNR public waters work permit program applies to public water basins, wetlands, and watercourses. A public waters work permit may be required for proposed projects that affect the course, current, or cross-section of public waters.

The DNR is seeking public comments on these three draft permits before making any permitting decisions. Commenters should include the words “NorthMet Dam Safety” or “NorthMet Public Waters” in the title of their comment emails or letters.

Written comments may be submitted no later than Oct. 16, by email to:
NorthMetPermitting.DNR@state.mn.us or by U.S. mail to:

MN Department of Natural Resources
ATTN: PolyMet NorthMet Project
500 Lafayette Road N, Box 45
St. Paul, MN 55155-4045

In addition to the two dam safety permits and the public waters work permit, the project would need nine additional DNR permits, as well as several other state, federal and local permits and approvals in order to proceed.

The DNR permits and approvals that are needed before the proposed NorthMet project could proceed, include the permit to mine (including financial assurance and wetlands replacement), water appropriation permits, dam safety permits, public waters work permit, burning permit, and an endangered species takings permit. A timeline of the permitting process is available from the DNR’s PolyMet website.

PolyMet’s dam safety and public waters work permit applications, along with DNR’s draft permits and fact sheets, are available on the State’s PolyMet Portal (click on the DNR link).

Source: Mn DNR

Paleontology Day featured at Hill Annex Mine State Park

Hill Annex Mine State Park, in partnership with the Calumet Public Library, will host a special Paleontology Day on Saturday, Sept. 23 with a day of fossil hunting tours. Staff from the Science Museum of Minnesota will help lead the fossil hunting tours and assist visitors with identification.  

The park gates will be open from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tours begin at 10 a.m. and last about 1 hour, 15 minutes.  The final tour will depart at 2 p.m. and return at 3:15 p.m.

Tours begin at the clubhouse museum, then board a bus for a short trip through the complex and stop at the fossil/ore pile. Visitors can spend as much time as they wish digging through the fossil/ore pile and have the option to return to the clubhouse on a later bus.

Tours prices are $10 for adults, $6 for children age 6 and older, and free for children age 5 and younger.

Historical archivist, Ian Dunshee, will be on site throughout the day presenting his work on cataloging the oral histories of former mine workers and artifacts from the mine.

“Hill Annex Mine State Park officially closed for the season on Labor Day Weekend, but we wanted to offer a day dedicated to the paleontology work that was conducted here by the Science Museum of Minnesota,” said park manager, Jordan Schaefer. Visitors are invited to bring a picnic lunch and make use of the picnic area. No RSVP is required.

Hill Annex Mine State Park is located at 800 Gary Street, Calumet, Minn. Entrance to the park is on the north edge of Calumet off State Highway 169, halfway between Grand Rapids and Hibbing.

Questions about the Paleontology Day program can be directed to Scenic State Park office at 218-743-3362. More information about Hill Annex Mine State Park can be found at www.mndnr.gov/state_parks/hill_annex_mine.

Source: Mn DNR

Shakopee artist wins duck stamp contest

A painting of a white-winged scoter by Shakopee artist Mark Thone will be featured on the 2018 Minnesota Migratory Waterfowl Stamp, after he won the annual stamp contest sponsored by the Department of Natural Resources.

This was Thone’s first time winning the duck stamp contest.

2018 Waterfowl Stamp

2018 Waterfowl Stamp competition.
First Place: Mark Thone

The winning painting was selected by judges from among 16 entries. Four entries advanced as finalists that were selected during the Sept. 7 contest. The other finalists were Michael Sieve, second place; John Barnard, third place; and Stephen Hamrick, fourth place. The duck stamp contest began in 1977.

The waterfowl stamp validation for hunting is $7.50 and for an extra 75 cents purchasers can receive the pictorial stamp. It also is sold as a collectible. Revenue from stamp sales is dedicated to waterfowl management and habitat work. Stamp sales generate about $700,000 per year for waterfowl habitat enhancement projects on state wildlife management areas and shallow lakes.

The DNR offers no prizes for the stamp contest winner, but the winning artist retains the right to reproduce the work. Each year the entries are limited to a predetermined species that breeds or migrates through Minnesota. The eligible species for the 2019 stamp design will be the gadwall. For more on the stamp contests, visit mndnr.gov/stamps.

Source: Mn DNR

DNR seeks citizens to serve on spending oversight committees

Minnesotans who would like to serve on committees that review how the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources spends game and fish fund dollars are welcome to submit an application by Sept. 25.

The DNR is seeking at least 12 people to serve on the Fisheries Oversight and Wildlife Oversight committees. Appointees will be responsible for reviewing the agency’s annual Game and Fish Fund Report in detail and, following discussions with agency leaders and others, write a report on the findings of this review. About half of the current members’ terms expire on Dec. 14, 2017, and are subject to this open application.

The two committees are comprised of members identified through a self-nomination process. Those who want to serve on the committees should have a strong interest in natural resource management and how it is funded. DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr will appoint committee members for three-year terms. Applications are being accepted until Sept. 25 online at the DNR’s Game and Fish Fund Budgetary Oversight webpage at mndnr.gov/gamefishoversight.

Though not well known, Minnesota’s Game and Fish Fund is the fiscal foundation for many of the state’s core natural resource management functions. Upwards of $110 million a year is deposited into this fund from hunting and fishing license sales, a sales tax on lottery tickets, and other sources of revenue, including a reimbursement based on a federal excise tax on certain hunting, fishing and boating equipment.

Committee members participate in a mid-December orientation meeting and one to two meetings per month January to May. Meetings are generally two hours in the evening at DNR headquarters in St. Paul, with the total time commitment estimated at 20 to 40 hours, plus travel time. Some members also attend monthly joint Budgetary Oversight Committee meetings January to May and may complete their report via email correspondence. Estimated additional time commitment is 12-15 hours, plus travel time. Members are asked to make three-year commitment.

Past DNR Game and Fish Fund expenditure reports and citizen oversight committee reports are also available at mndnr.gov/gamefishoversight.

Source: Mn DNR

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